YOUR FIRST VISIT

COMPREHENSIVE EXAM

A Comprehensive Exam is done for adults and includes a complete full mouth examination, review of x-rays, check blood pressure, screening for periodontal disease, oral cancer screening, and vitamin C screening. The doctor will also diagnose what type of cleaning best fits the needs of the patient.

RADIOGRAPHS

Radiographs for a first visit for an adult are twenty individual films. These are called a full mouth series of x-rays and are done once every 3-5 years. Bitewing x-rays are four films taken of the back teeth annually.

TEETH CLEANING

For adults, the first teeth cleaning will be scheduled after the doctor has completed the comprehensive exam and diagnosed what type of cleaning best fits the patient. For a child, the first visit will be a cleaning with the hygienist, an exam with the doctor and bitewing x-rays. A fluoride treatment may also be done.

PATIENT FORMS

We know that your time is valuable. Help us speed up your visit.
Please download and fill out your forms before your next appointment.

Download instructions: Click on each link and the document will open in a new tab/window. You can save it to your computer from there.

Patient Information Form
Health History Form
HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices
Financial Policy
Dental Restorative Materials Fact Sheet

If you prefer to download them all at once, here is a zip file: Zipped Patient Forms

To view these documents on your computer you’ll need Adobe Acrobat Reader.
If you do not already have it, you can download it here

Download instructions: Click on each link and the document will open in a new tab/window. You can save it to your computer from there.

Patient Information Form
Health History Form
HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices
Financial Policy
Dental Restorative Materials Fact Sheet

If you prefer to download them all at once, here is a zip file: Zipped Patient Forms

To view these documents on your computer you’ll need Adobe Acrobat Reader.
If you do not already have it, you can download it here

The following form is for kids 18 and older to give us permission to talk to your parents about your dental treatment and care.

Consent Form Adult Children

To view these documents on your computer you’ll need Adobe Acrobat Reader.
If you do not already have it, you can download it here

PATIENT HEALTH

BRUSHING

Tooth brushing is an important way to improve your oral health. It removes the debris on your teeth left over from eating – reducing cavity causing bacteria and sugars.

One effective, easy-to-remember technique involves using a circular or elliptical motion to brush a couple of teeth at a time, gradually covering the entire mouth.

Place a toothbrush beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle and gently brush teeth in an elliptical motion. Brush the outside of the teeth, inside the teeth, your tongue, the chewing surfaces and between teeth. Using a back-and-forth motion causes the gum surface to recede, can expose the root surface or make the root surface tender. You also risk wearing down the gum line.

Tooth brushing should be done at least twice a day. You should spend at least two minutes every time. Fluoridated tooth paste with the ADA seal of approval should be used. Topically applied fluoride has been shown to reduce the risk for cavities. Oh, and don’t forget to floss!

FLOSSING

Why Floss: Using it once a day helps fight decay

Some people loop. Some people spool. Others simply refuse. The verdict is in: Flossing is one of the best things you can ever do to take care of your teeth.
“Flossing every 24 hours to break up plaque is imperative for good oral health,” says Gordon Isbell, DMD, MAGD, spokesperson for the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD).

An article in the October 2005 issue of AGD Impact, AGD’s monthly newsmagazine, describes how floss is the single most important factor in preventing periodontal disease, which affects more than 50 percent of adults.

Flossing, which is just as important as brushing, helps removes the plaque and debris that stick to teeth and gums in between the teeth. It also helps polish the tooth’s surface and control bad breath.

Dental floss can be waxed or unwaxed, flavored and unflavored, wide and regular. All floss helps clean and remove plaque. Wider floss, also known as dental tape, may help people with a lot of bridgework and is usually recommended when the spaces between teeth are wide. Waxed floss can be easier to slide between teeth with very little space between. Unwaxed floss makes a squeaking sound which let the user know their teeth are clean.

Recently, electric flossers have entered the scene, but most dentists contend there is no substitute for manually flossing one’s teeth.

“Electric flossing is no substitute, but if someone has a disability (and can’t manually floss,) it is better than nothing,” says Dr. Isbell.

Similarly, dentists say that waterpicks should not be used as a substitute for brushing and flossing because they don’t remove plaque. Dentists do recommend waterpicks for people with gum disease who have trouble flossing because of pain.

PRODUCTS

Buy in office only.

  • Brushes – Sonicare: Flexcare Series, Oral B: Smart Series 5000, replacement heads for both
  • Rinse – Oral B: Fluorinse, Oxyfresh
  • Paste – Colgate: Prevident 5000, 3M: Clinpro 5000
  • Floss – J & J: Reach Flosser